Granthams' Guide to the HP Latex

July 11, 2018

Granthams' Guide to the HP Latex

With every update in the HP Latex range, it can be difficult to know which one will add the most value to your print business.
It's also important to buy the features you need and not spend on functions that you don’t.

With this in mind, I’m going to run through the information and differences between models along with adding some customer experiences we’ve had here at Granthams.

Firstly, let's start off by saying what you do get regardless of which latex model you pick.

All of them use the same ink-set, the same print-head modules and all output at the same high resolution.
Whichever model finds its way into your premises, you are not going to be disappointed with the quality of print throughput.

Entry model - HP Latex 115

 The 115 is HP’s first model in its current latex line-up.
It accepts a maximum roll width of 1371mm and will comfortably take media up to a weight of around 25kgs. 
At it’s indoor quality setting, it’ll run through your jobs at around 12 m2/hour.
Colour comes courtesy of its 6 x 400ml cartridges along with the HP Optimiser that helps ink adhesion whenever the substrate needs it.

It’s perfect for the user who is not expecting to be printing 24/7 but still needs wide format graphics of the highest standard.

HP Latex 315

The 315 moves up a gear in terms of spec. Still at 1371mm maximum width, this is the first of the HP latex range with HP’s innovative OMAS sensor.
The Optical Media Advance Sensor, (you can see why its shortened to OMAS), analyses the media as it runs through the machine making micro adjustments to keep the path true. 

When you’re producing exhibition pop-up prints or wallpaper murals, the OMAS can help the panels line up.

The 315 also uses six larger capacity 775ml colour ink cartridges plus HP’s Optimiser.

Designed for the print company running a lower work volume, it comes fully prepared for work duty with HP’s RIP in a box. Although not quite as equipped as a standalone RIP software, it is adept enough to get you up and printing in the shortest timeframe possible.
As part of HP’s profiling library, there is direct access via the internet from the machine’s front panel to a growing list of media manufacturer profiles.

For HP’s full spec on the machine click here.

Next model up – HP Latex 335

Identical in most respects to the 315, the main difference is in the media width it can take. 
The 335 accepts rolls up to 1625mm wide. As the rolls are a little wider, it can also hold up to 42kgs in weight.
At 1625mm wide it’ll print a little more per hour and to help get you on your way, the 335 also arrives with the HP RIP software.

The 335 arrives with a take-up reel to help with spooling up the printed work as it feeds out. As latex technology is virtually instant dry, being able to roll it all on the take-up reel for finishing later can make the whole print process more efficient.

For HP’s complete spec on the 335 click here.

HP Latex 365

There are a few changes under the hood with the 365.
No RIP software this time as the 365 is probably destined to live in a busy print production environment.

It’ll work with all the main RIPs – Onyx, Flexi and SignLab – so if you already have a preference, the HP can be added in. 
If you’re not sure, talk to us for advice.
The same maximum width of 1625mm, and roll weight – 42kgs – of the 335.

The 365, however, will motor through media at a speedy 17 square metres per hour at the indoor quality setting. 
Load it up, stand back and watch it go.

 The machine itself is very similar looking to the models above: a compact design that has the usual HP hallmarks of quality engineering.

The differences here come in the form of an inbuilt spectrophotometer. Sounds complicated I know but in plain English it means it’ll profile media itself.
Just in case there aren’t the settings in the online library for that unique product your customer has specified, the 365 will do its own thing and get your job out with minimum fuss.

I know many people who’ve come to rely on this feature and just as many who have said it helped them get that job out that was dropped on them today but was needed yesterday.

Another clever addition is the ink collector unit. Extremely useful when printing edge to edge as it catches any stray ink droplets, it also comes into its own when working with fabrics.
As we see more latex printers being used for décor purposes (and HP themselves know this is a rapidly growing sector), previous fabric media had to have a paper backing to help it run through the machine and to keep the ink from seeping through.
The HP 365 doesn’t need the paper back and the ink collector unit ensures everything is kept clean. Flags, mesh, tablecloths and more, it opens up plenty of new opportunities.

Making machine operation simpler, the front of the 365 also has a bigger 8” touchscreen panel compared to the 4” of the previous models.

For the full spec on the 365 click here.

The big guns – HP Latex 560

 Still within the latex range, we jump up from the 3 series to the 5 and no, it doesn’t mean more leather and better leg room!

The 560 has everything the 365 has and then adds in spindle-less loading for total ease of use. No more feeding the bar through the roll, these little things just help to make production more efficient.
Speaking of roll-fed media and simple loading, the 560’s weight limit has been raised up to 55kgs.
If you’re looking to load up the printer and leave to run, being able to take this extra weight means you can order longer rolls and keep production moving.
PVC banner grades, roller banner display films and other supplies are often available at 50 or 60m lengths.

I know of printers who’ll pop a longer roll in as they are leaving for the night and let it print through. 
It's like having a colleague who works nights without complaint and won’t drink all the coffee!

All this extra capacity is great but what if there’s no extra speed to print it?
Fortunately, HP made the 560 (and 570) up their game to around 23 m2/hour. 

The 560 also utilises a wiper roller that in the simplest of terms ensures that on certain budget media, the inks still look as vibrant as possible.

For the spec on the 560 click here.

HP Latex 570

The last latex printer in this roundup is the 570 model.

It’s identical to the 560 except for one (major) difference: instead of 775ml cartridges, this one feeds off a 3-litre bulk system.
With one three litre tank for each colour, if you’re going to use these all day every day, these are more cost-effective than standard cartridges.
They can also be hot-swapped whilst the printer is running so you can use all the ink available before changing over. There’s even a beacon on top of the machine which like a traffic light, will tell you instantly whether it’s happy or not.

 For full info on the latex 570, click here.

If I’ve missed anything out or you have any specific questions, get in touch in any of the usual ways or through social media.
At Granthams we know the right printer is the one that fits into your business and we like to think we’ve been around long enough to know how to help.

For more info on the HP Latex range, follow this link.